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Sagebrush (White)
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Sandalwood (East Indian)
Sandalwood (West Indian)
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Saro
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Savine
Savory
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Spearmint
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Spruce (Black)
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Tangerine
Tansy
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Tea Tree (Mexican)
Tea Tree (White)
Tejpat
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Thyme
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Vetivert
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Wintergreen
Wormseed
Wormwood
Xanthoxylum
Yarrow
Ylang Ylang
Yuzu
Yuzu Absolute
Zdravetz
Zedoary
 

  Oils A-B      Oils C-E      Oils F-J      Oils K-N      Oils O-R      Oils S-Z  

 
Sage -- Salvia officinalis   aka:  Salvia salvatric Latin AliasOleum Salviae
French NameSauge  Spanish NameSalvia  German NameSalbei  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Lamiales, Family: Lamiaceae, Genus: Salvia L.   Specie: Salvia officinalis  L.
Etymology:  Salvia - Whole or sound         officinalis - A plant used officially in medicine
From: China  Turkey  USA 
 Recommended Dilution: High Note: Top Astral Bodies: Jupiter  Venus   Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity: Yang     Element: Air Plant Height: 20-50 cm
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 2 yrs Magical Powers: Protection   Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Leaves
 Specific Gravity: 0.902Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Warm Resinous Scent
Approaches: 
Infusion  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Do-Not-Use-in-the-Bath     Epilepsy(Avoid-if-you-have-epilepsy)     Keep-Away-From-Children     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)     Use-Sparingly     Use-With-Extreme-Caution
Health Uses: 
Acne   Arthritis (Rheumatoid)   Asthma   Bronchitis   Dandruff   Eczema   Gingivitis   Hair Loss   Infertility (Female)   Low Blood Pressure   Menopause   Night Sweats   Rheumatism   Sores   Sprains  
Properties: 
Anti-bacterial   Anti-cancer   Anti-septic-general   Anti-spasmodic   Decongestant   Diuretic   Nervine  
Oil Constituents
Camphor  1,8 Cineole  Coumarines  α-Humulene  Linalol  β-Thujone  Viridiflorol 

Abstract: 
Sage oil should always be used with serious caution. There are reports of uterine contractions and excessive menstral bleeding (nearing haemorrhage) simply from using 5 to 10 drops of Sage oil in a bath or carrier oil for massage. Sage is typically high in Thujone and Thujone exposure is certainly one main cause for concern with Sage oil. Often aromatherapists will use Clary Sage as a great alternative oil.

Open Source PDF Documents for Sage
 
1. A Review on Antidermatophytic Efficiency of Plant Essential Oils
2. Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils: Potential Application in Food
3. Antifungal Activity and Chemical Composition of Twenty Essential Oils Against Fungi
4. Antifungal Investigations on Plant Essential Oils. A Review
5. Antimicrobial Action of Essential Oils: The Effect of DSMO on Cinnamon Oil
6. Antimicrobial and Antiviral Effects of Essential Oils from Apiaceae and Lamiaceae
7. Antimicrobial Properties of Some Essential Oils against Pathogenic Microorganisms
8. Antioxidant Attributes of Four Lamiaceae Essential Oils
9. Antioxidant Property of Volatile Oils Determined by the Ferric Reducing Ability
10. Aromatherapy in the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders
11. Chemical Characterization of Volatile Components of Salvia officinalis
 
12. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils of Ten Plants
13. Essential Oil Composition Variability in Sage (Salvia officinalis L.)
14. Essential Oil Interventions for Premenstrual Syndrome and the Menopause
15. Essential Oils and Hypertension
16. Essential Oils with Antibacterial, Antifungal, Antiviral, Cytotoxic Properties
17. Essential Oils: Their Antibacterial Properties and Potential Application in Food
18. GC-MS Analysis of Essential Oils from Salvia officinalis L.
19. Optimising Fertility with Essential Oils
20. Potent Protection
21. The Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils Grown in Ash shoubak
22. The Influence of the Distallation Method on the Chemcial Composition of Oil of Sage


 
Sagebrush (White) -- Artemisia ludoviciana
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Asterales, Family: Asteraceae, Genus: Artemisia L.   Specie: Artemisia ludoviciana  Nutt.
From: USA 
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Middle Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 1 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Leaves/Twigs
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption

Addendum(s)
 Note
This oil has a scent similar to Roman Chamomile.

Open Source PDF Document for Sagebrush (White): 
1. Antioomycete Activity of Artemisia ludoviciana


 
Sandalwood (African) -- Osyris lanceolata   aka:  Osyris abyssinica  --- Please see Sandalwood (Australian)
 


 
Sandalwood (Australian) -- Santalum spicatum   aka:  Santalum austracalidonicum , Santalum yasi Latin AliasOleum Santali
French NameSantal  German NameSantalholz  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Santalales, Family: Santalaceae, Genus: Santalum L.   Specie: Santalum spicatum  L.
From: Australia  Tasmania 
Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Base Astral Bodies: Uranus   Plant Catagory: Tree
Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: Base-Middle Polarity: Yang     Element: Air Plant Height: 5-6 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: Protection   Extraction: S/D,S/E
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point: 131-133° F      Plant Part: Wood
 Specific Gravity: 0.950 - 0.980Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Warm Spicy Scent
Approaches: 
Candles  Diffuser  Wood Fires  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Internal-Use-May-Plug-Kidney-Tubules     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-First-Trimester)
Health Uses: 
Acne   Athletes Foot   Bladder Infection   Bronchitis   Candida   Cold Sores   Coughs   Cystitis   Diarrhea   Hemorrhoids   Hiccoughs   Impotence   Insomnia   Laryngitis   Nausea   Ringworm   Thrush   Tuberculosis   Urinary Tract Infections   Vomiting  
Emotional States: 
Depression   Stress (Emotional)   Stress (Mental)
Properties: 
Anti-bacterial   Anti-catarrh   Anti-depressant   Anti-fungal   Anti-microbial   Anti-septic-general   Anti-septic-urinary   Anti-viral   Aphrodisiac   Astringent   Carminative   Diuretic   Expectorant   Fixative   Sedative   Tonic-general  
Oil Constituents
α-Santalol  β-Santalol 
Deters These Pests: 
Flies (black)

Abstract: 
Oil from this plant is almost identical to that of East Indian Sandalwood, Santalum album. East Indian Sandalwood has been over-exploited so much that it is almost extinct now. Oil from Austalian trees comes from a much more renewable source.

For high quality oil Sandalwood trees should be at least 30 feet high before harvesting them (generally taking about 30 years to reach that height).

Addendum(s)
 Note
Its often said that Sandalwood oil actually becomes more valuable with age.

Open Source PDF Documents for Sandalwood (Australian)
 
1. A Novel Method to Estimate the Contribution of the Vapor Activity of Essential Oils
2. Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils and their Synergy with Fluconazole
3. Comparison of Oil Concentration from Santalum spicatum and S. album
4. Essential Oils as Therapeutics
5. In vitro anti-viral effect of β-santalol against Influenza
 
6. Inhibitory Effect of Essential Oils Against Herpes
7. International Sandalwood Symposium 2012
8. Olivia's Essential Oils Guide for Dummies
9. Sandalwood Research Newsletter
10. The Effect of Stimulating and Soothing Smells on Heart Rate and Memory


 
Sandalwood (East Indian) -- Santalum album  --- Please see Sandalwood (Australian)     Latin AliasOleum Santali     
 Note: East Indian Sandalwood has been over-exploited so much that it is almost extinct now. Oil from Austalian trees comes from a much more renewable source.
 


 
Sandalwood (West Indian) -- Amyris balsamifera  --- Please see Amyris
 


 
Santolina -- Santolina chamaecyparissus   aka:  Lavandula taemina    ---      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 
Spanish Name: Abrotamo Hembra  

Currently I am unable to find specific details as to why this oil is on several people's "Don't Touch It!" list. Many sources do not give any reason whatsoever while some sources simply say "It's too toxic." or "Never use it." or "I would never have it in my house."

There are a number of oils that appear to be in a "Grey Area" category. For example, I have noticed that some authors will shy away from Cedar Leaf and Mugwort claiming that they are "Too toxic for use in aromatherapy". Then, 4 other books will go on to explain all of the uses for Cedar Leaf and Mugwort. Likely the cause for concern with these two particular oils is Thujone. Whether or not the author then goes on to talk about Thujone, this particular cause for concern is a valid one. Many sources are void of any reasons that explain why a particular oil should be avoided. Occasionally, one source here or there will even contradict itself within the same document saying that it is toxic on one page and its used for __________ on another page.

Two things seem consistent, however.

 1.  Several different book authors agree that this oil should not be used in aromatherapy.
 2. Often, merchants who have this oil listed for sale either ignore all of the warnings, don't know about them, or explain how their particular oil is somehow special and not toxic.

Erring on the side of safety, this oil will stay on my Unused list unless future information can convince me otherwise. If you are interested in some purported property or health benefit from this particular oil, consider using a different oil - we've got plenty.

Unraveling the mysteries of the Unused is a path of brambles. The search for answers continues.

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Saro -- Cinnamosma fragrans
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Magnoliales, Family: Canellaceae, Genus: Cinnamosma L.   Specie: Cinnamosma fragrans  L.
From: Madagascar 
 Recommended Dilution: High Note: Top Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Tree
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: Middle-Top Polarity     Element Plant Height: 20 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 2 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Leaves
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches: 
Bath  Chest Rub  Diffuser  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Not-For-Internal-Consumption
Health Uses: 
Headaches   Muscle Pain  
Properties: 
Anti-fungal   Anti-infectious   Anti-inflammatory   Anti-septic-general   Anti-viral   Decongestant   Expectorant   Stimulant-immune-system  


 
Sassafras -- Sassafras albidum   aka:  Sassafras officinale    ---      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 This oil was sometimes used in the past and has the Latin alias of Oleum Sassafras

French Name: Sassafras  German Name: Sassafrasholz  

The base note oil is usually distilled from the roots or bark of the tree, however the flowers and leaves yield essential oil as well.

Sassafras oil is said to be carcinogenic (Cancer-Causing) and even lethal in medium to large doses by some sources.

This oil is banned by the FDA because of its carcinogenic properties. The oil is also banned in Europe for use in toiletries and cosmetics. It's likely that Sassafras oil is banned because it contains a large percentage of Safrole which is a known precursor to the manufacture of hallucinogenic, narcotic, and psychotropic substances. However, some suppliers produce a "Safrole-Free" oil that they purport to be a "safer" oil.

Whether carcinogenic or not, Sassafras oil has several constituents to be wary of. It's contents typically include Anethole, Apiol, Eugenol, and Myristicin in addition to Safrole - all of which are Phenols!   Phenols are skin irritants and, with continued use or in large quantities, can be toxic to the liver. It would appear that Sassafras oil is one big Phenol soup. In addition to that it also contains Thujone which is a known neurotoxin. So, even with the Safrole removed, I still don't believe it would be safe for use!

Sassafras has a long "American white-man's" history. According to G.B. Emerson in his book Trees and Shrubs of Massachusetts Columbus smelled the scent of the Sassafras tree before his crew was able to see land and the scent encouraged them to continue. Sassafras was one of the first exports from the U.S. as demand for it in Europe was significant in the 1600's. It was commonly used for treating syphilis and other venereal disease, though it is no longer believed to be useful in that respect. The leaves and bark have been used in herbalogy for generations, especially among Native Americans. The oil was used as a flavor ingredient in the past but has likely been completely discontinued in light of our current understanding of the oil's chemical make-up.

Some aromatherapists still advocate the use of Sassafras oil for its theurapeutic properties. To quote Daniele Ryman,

"Sassafras is a tonic combating fatigue and nervous depression, and is used after strenuous exercise. It also possesses diuretic and anti-rheumatic properties, and helps treat lumbago and back problems." (The Aromatherapy Handbook  pg. 35)

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Savine -- Juniperus sabina   aka:  Juniperus phoenicea , Sabina cacumina    ---
      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 This oil was sometimes used in the past and has the Latin alias of Oleum Sabinae

Savine oil (aka Savin oil) has a repulsive smell which is reason enough to not use it in aromatherapy. In addition, the oil contains podophyllotoxin which is a poison, which in high concentrations destroys human cells and can cause death. Obviously, Savine oil should never be used for aromatherapy.

In the past Savine oil was commonly taken orally in the belief that it would cause an abortion. There was and is some speculation as to whether or not this worked. According to Graves, (Hortus Medicus  pdf pg. 177): "A woman took daily, for twenty days, no less than a hundred drops of the oil, yet carried her child to the full term." Other sources suggest that Savine oil is an oral toxin and a nerve poison as well.

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Savory -- Satureja montana   aka:  Satureja hortensis , Satureja obovata    ---
      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 Several sources mention that Savory oil is a dermal toxin and mucous membrane irritant. It seems difficult to find further information, however.

The oil is produced in France and steam distilled from the leaves.

I currently do not know enough about this oil to know if it is safe for use in aromatherapy nor do I know of any benefits from doing so. Email with any "hard data" such as clinical reports or trade journal articles or even GC-MS reports concerning this oil would be much appreciated.   jonnsaromatherapy@yahoo.com

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Spanish Broom -- Spartium junceum    ---      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 
Spanish Name: Retama  

Currently I am unable to find specific details as to why this oil is on several people's "Don't Touch It!" list. Many sources do not give any reason whatsoever while some sources simply say "It's too toxic." or "Never use it." or "I would never have it in my house."

There are a number of oils that appear to be in a "Grey Area" category. For example, I have noticed that some authors will shy away from Cedar Leaf and Mugwort claiming that they are "Too toxic for use in aromatherapy". Then, 4 other books will go on to explain all of the uses for Cedar Leaf and Mugwort. Likely the cause for concern with these two particular oils is Thujone. Whether or not the author then goes on to talk about Thujone, this particular cause for concern is a valid one. Many sources are void of any reasons that explain why a particular oil should be avoided. Occasionally, one source here or there will even contradict itself within the same document saying that it is toxic on one page and its used for __________ on another page.

Two things seem consistent, however.

 1.  Several different book authors agree that this oil should not be used in aromatherapy.
 2. Often, merchants who have this oil listed for sale either ignore all of the warnings, don't know about them, or explain how their particular oil is somehow special and not toxic.

Erring on the side of safety, this oil will stay on my Unused list unless future information can convince me otherwise. If you are interested in some purported property or health benefit from this particular oil, consider using a different oil - we've got plenty.

Unraveling the mysteries of the Unused is a path of brambles. The search for answers continues.

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Spearmint -- Mentha spicata Latin AliasOleum Menthae Viridis
French NameMenthe Verte  German NameGrüne Minze  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Lamiales, Family: Lamiaceae, Genus: Mentha L.   Specie: Mentha spicata  L.
Etymology:  Mentha - Minthe, daughter of Cocyton         spicata - Latin - like a spire
From: Europe  India  Mediteranean  Russia  S. Africa  USA  Washington State 
 Recommended Dilution: Low Note: Top Astral Bodies: Venus   Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity: Yin     Element: Water Plant Height: 50-100 cm
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 5 yrs Magical Powers: Lust   Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe (Diluted) Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Leaves
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image Sweet Minty Scent
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Keep-Away-From-Children     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)     Skin-Irritant(mild)
Health Uses: 
Acne   Bronchitis   Candida   Colic   Constipation   Cystitis   Diarrhea   Eczema   Fever   Flatulence   Headaches   Hypertension   Indigestion   Kidney Stones   Menstration (Irregular)   Migraines   Morning Sickness   Nausea   Obesity   Sinus Infections   Sores  
Properties: 
Anti-bacterial   Anti-catarrh   Anti-fungal   Anti-inflammatory   Anti-septic-general   Anti-spasmodic   Healing   Insecticidal   Stimulant-general  
Oil Constituents
Camphene  Carveol  Carvone (51%-65%)   Limonene (11%-25%)   Menthol  Pulegone 
Deters These Pests: 
Ants   Aphids   Beetle (flea)   Caterpillars   Gnats   Moths

Addendum(s)
 Plant Growing Tips
Sow the seeds outside in late spring (after frost has past), in most soils with partial sun. Harvest leaves when desired for teas, cooking, potpourri, or essential oil distillation.

Open Source PDF Documents for Spearmint
 
1. American Druggist and Pharmaceutical Record - Mint
2. Antibacterial Activity of Six Essential Oils Against Pathogenic Bacteria
3. Antiemetic Activity of Oil of Mint in Chemotherapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting
4. Antifungal Properties of Essential Oil of Mentha spicata
5. Antimicrobial and Antiviral Effects of Essential Oils from Apiaceae and Lamiaceae
6. Aromatherapy in Pregnancy
7. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils of Ten Plants
8. Chemical Composition of Mentha pulegium and Mentha spicata
 
9. Chemical Profiling of Menta spicata and Mentha citrata
10. Comparative Analysis of Mentha spicata and Camellia sinensis
11. Essential Oil Composition of Sixteen Elite Cultivars of Mentha
12. Essential Oils as Novel Human Skin Penetration Enhancer - Transdermal Drug Delivery
13. Essential Oils with Antibacterial, Antifungal, Antiviral, Cytotoxic Properties
14. Mineral Content, Essential Oil Components of Peppermint and Spearmint
15. The Yield and Essential Oil Content of Mint (Mentha ssp.) in Northern Ostrobothnia
16. Versatile Psychophysiological Potencies of Essential Oils


 
Spikenard -- Nardostachys grandiflora   aka:  Nardostachys jatamansi , Aralia racemosa
French NameSpic-nard  German NameNardenkraut  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Dipsacales, Family: Valerianaceae, Genus: Nardostachys L.   Specie: Nardostachys grandiflora  L.
From: China  India  Nepal  Tibet 
Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Base Astral Bodies: Saturn  Venus   Plant Catagory: Perennial
Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity: Yin     Element: Water Plant Height: 5-100 cm
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Root
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)
Health Uses: 
Body Odor   Candida   Flatulence   Indigestion   Insomnia   Menstration (Irregular)   Migraines   Nausea   Rashes   Wounds  
Properties: 
Anti-bacterial   Anti-fungal   Anti-infectious   Anti-inflammatory   Anti-parasitic   Deodorant   Vulnerary  
Oil Constituents
Borneol
Bornyl acetate
Eugenol
Isobornyl valerianate
Patchouli alcohol
Pinene
Terpineol
Valeranone

Addendum(s)
 Plant Growing Tips
Spikenard grows between 3000m and 5000m in the Himalayan Mountains and is usually found on rocky, north-facing slopes. If you live there, you will likely have great luck growing it!

Open Source PDF Documents for Spikenard
 
1. A Review on Biological Activities of Nardostachys jatamansi
 
2. Standardization and Phytochemical Screening of Nardostachys jatamansi


 
Spruce (Black) -- Picea mariana
   
 
Div: Coniferophyta, Class: Pinopsida, Order: Pinales, Family: Pinaceae, Genus: Picea L.   Specie: Picea mariana  L.
Etymology:  Picea - Spruce         mariana - Named after the Virgin Mary
From: Canada  USA 
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Top Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Tree
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 5-15 m
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 2 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Needles
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption
Health Uses: 
Acne   Arthritis (Rheumatoid)   Body Odor   Bronchitis   Coughs   Dry Skin   Eczema   Muscle Aches   Muscle Spasms   Rheumatism  
Emotional States: 
Anxiety   Stress (Mental)   Stress (Physical)
Properties: 
Anti-inflammatory   Anti-septic-general   Anti-spasmodic   Deodorant   Diuretic   Rubefacient  


 
St. John's Wort -- Hypericum perforatum Latin AliasOleum Hyperici
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Theales, Family: Clusiaceae, Genus: Hypericum L.   Specie: Hypericum perforatum  L.
Etymology:  Hypericum - Greek word for an upper icon, used to be hung above things         perforatum - To perforate
 From: Bulgaria  Poland  USA U.S. Growth Region: 3-8
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Middle Astral Bodies: Sun   Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity: Yang     Element: Fire Plant Height: 40-50 cm
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: Love  Protection   Extraction: CO2,S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Whole Plant
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches: 
Infusion  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Phototoxic(mild)     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)
Health Uses: 
Bruises   Colds   Fever   Varicose Veins  
Emotional States: 
Depression
Properties: 
Anti-depressant   Anti-inflammatory   Anti-microbial   Astringent  

Open Source PDF Documents for St. John's Wort
 
1. Analysis of the Essential Oils of Two Hypericum Species
2. Chemical Composition of Hypericum perforatum L. Essential Oil
 
3. Extraction and Analysis of Hypericum perforatum L. from Turkey
4. Hypericum Species as Sources of Valuable Essential Oils


 
Tagetes -- Tagetes bipinata   aka:  Tagetes glandulifera
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Asterales, Family: Asteraceae, Genus: Tagetes L.   Specie: Tagetes bipinata  L.
From: Africa  France  Madagascar  N. America 
 Recommended Dilution: High Note: Middle Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Annual
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: Base-Middle-Top Polarity     Element Plant Height: 30-50 cm
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Leaves/Flowers
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Deep Resinous Scent
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Internal-Use-May-Plug-Kidney-Tubules     Keep-Away-From-Children     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Phototoxic(high)     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)     Skin-Irritant(medium)     Use-Sparingly
Properties: 
Anti-fungal  
Oil Constituents
Coumarines  Dihydrotagetone  Tagetone 
Deters These Pests: 
Eel Worms   Flies (black)   Flies (carrot)   Flies (green)   Flies (white)   Gnats   Nematodes


 
Tamala -- Cinnamomum tamala
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Laurales, Family: Lauraceae, Genus: Cinnamomum Schaeff.   Specie: Cinnamomum tamala  Buch.-Ham.
From: Nepal 
 Recommended Dilution: High Note: Base Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Tree
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: Base-Middle Polarity     Element Plant Height: 20 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Leaves/Twigs
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Not-For-Internal-Consumption
Health Uses: 
Arthritis (Rheumatoid)   Athletes Foot   Headaches   Inflamed Joints   Insomnia   Muscle Pain  
Properties: 
Anti-fungal   Anti-inflammatory   Bactericides  
Oil Constituents
β-Caryophyllene (25%)  

Open Source PDF Documents for Tamala
 
1. Chemical Compositions of Cinnamomum tamala Oil from Regions of India
2. Tamala - Cinnamomum tamala: A Valuable Tree from Himalayas
 
3. Variability in Volatile Constituents of Cinnamomum tamala from Uttarakhand


 
Tamarack -- Larix laricina
   
 
Div: Coniferophyta, Class: Pinopsida, Order: Pinales, Family: Pinaceae, Genus: Larix L.   Specie: Larix laricina  L.
From: Canada  USA U.S. Growth Region: 1-2-3-4
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Top Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Tree
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 10-20 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 2 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Leaves/Twigs
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption
Health Uses: 
Colds   Respiratory Infections   Respiratory Tract Infections  
Properties: 
Anti-infectious   Anti-inflammatory   Anti-septic-general   Anti-spasmodic   Decongestant   Expectorant   Stimulant-immune-system   Tonic-neuro  


 
Tangerine -- Citrus reticulata   aka:  Citrus nobilis
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Sapindales, Family: Rutaceae, Genus: Citrus L.   Specie: Citrus reticulata  L.
Etymology:  Citrus - Citrus like, from Citron in Judaea         reticulata - Made like a net
 From: China  Italy  USA 
 Recommended Dilution: Low Note: Top Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Tree
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 12-15 m
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 2 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: C/P,E/S/E,F/D,M/A/E
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Fruit Peel
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image 
Approaches: 
Humidifier  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption
Health Uses: 
Cellulite   Constipation   Diarrhea   Flatulence   Insomnia   Lymphatic Drainage   Obesity   Stretch Marks   Water Retention  
Properties: 
Anti-inflammatory   Laxative   Sedative  
Oil Constituents
Limonene  Linalol  β-Myrcene  Nerol  Pinene 
Deters These Pests: 
Cats

Abstract: 
This oil is very similar to Mandarin but is lighter.


 
Tansy -- Tanacetum vulgare   aka:  Tanadetum vulgare , Chrysanthemum vulgare    ---
      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 This oil was sometimes used in the past and has the Latin alias of Oleum Tanaceti

Spanish Name: Tanaceto  

Tansy oil is known to cause convulsions and epileptic seizures. It is lethal in high doses. It contains high levels of Thujone and should never be used in aromatherapy.

Some sources say that oil from Tanacetum vulgare can cause irregular heartbeat, rigid pupils, uterine bleeding, hepatitis, rapid breathing, convulsions, and loss of consciousness.

Oil extracted from Tanacetum anuum is known by different names, however, I have it listed on this site as Blue Tansy. Oil from Tanacetum vulgare is different in chemical makeup from Tanacetum anuum. Oil from Tanacetum vulgare typically has between a 60% and 80% Thujone content making it toxic.

There is a lot of confusion regarding Tansy oil and Blue Tansy oil. There are several reasons for this confusion. The plethera of names for these two oils is mostly the cause of this.

Anyone wishing to use Blue Tansy, perhaps to treat radiation burns, should be very sure about their supplier. I suggest talking to the merchant and learning as much as possible before purchasing and trying their product.

European folklore suggests that the herb, not the oil, has been used to expel worms, treat fevers, and prevent miscarriages.

As a side note, this plant is listed as a noxious weed in the United States. See here: U.S. Federal and State Noxious Weeds

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Tarragon -- Artemisia dracunculus
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Asterales, Family: Asteraceae, Genus: Artemisia L.   Specie: Artemisia dracunculus  L.
Etymology:  Artemisia - The Goddess Artemis         dracunculus - Dragon
 From: Canada  France  Hungary  USA U.S. Growth Region: 3-8
 Recommended Dilution: High Note: Middle Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Shrub
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 1-2 m
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Leaves
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Keep-Away-From-Children     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)
Health Uses: 
Anorexia   Dyspepsia   Flatulence   Indigestion   Infertility (Female)   Menstration (Amenorrhoea)   Menstration (Dysmenorrhoea)   Menstration (Irregular)   Urinary Tract Infections  
Properties: 
Deodorant   Emmenagogues   Stimulant-appetite   Stimulant-brain   Stimulant-circulatory   Stimulant-digestive   Stimulant-nervous-system   Vermifuge  
Oil Constituents
Methyl chavicol 

Open Source PDF Documents for Tarragon
 
1. Christmas Gingerbread and Christmas Cheer
2. Comparative Sporicidal Effects of Volatile Oils
 
3. Essential Oils and Hypertension
4. Optimising Fertility with Essential Oils


 
Tea Tree -- Melaleuca alternifolia
French NameArbre à thé  German NameTeebaumöl  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Myrtales, Family: Myrtaceae, Genus: Melaleuca L.   Specie: Melaleuca alternifolia  L.
Etymology:  Melaleuca - Greek: Mela - black, leuca - white; references the black trunks and white branches of some species         alternifolia - Alternate leaves
 From: Australia  Borneo  Tasmania 
 Recommended Dilution: Any Note: Top Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Tree
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 20-25 m
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe (Diluted) Oil Flash Point: 121-123° F      Plant Part: Leaves/Twigs
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Light Resinous Scent
Approaches: 
Bath  Chest Rub  Compress  Diffuser  Foot Bath  Humidifier  Sauna  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-First-Trimester)     Skin-Irritant(mild)
Health Uses: 
Acne   Athletes Foot   Bronchitis   Candida   Cold Sores   Colds   Coughs   Cuts   Diarrhea   Fungal Infections   Hair Follicle Mites   Infections   Rashes   Ringworm   Scrapes   Sore Throats   Sunburns   Thrush   Tonsillitis   Toothaches   Warts   Whooping Cough   Wounds  
Properties: 
Analgesic   Anti-bacterial   Anti-biotic   Anti-fungal   Anti-infectious   Anti-inflammatory   Anti-parasitic   Anti-septic-general   Anti-viral   Decongestant   Expectorant   Vulnerary  
Oil Constituents
1,8 Cineole (0%-5.4%)
Limonene (0%-1.1%)
β-Myrcene (0.9%-1.1%)
Para-cymene (1.4%-3.1%)
α-Pinene (2.5%-3%)
β-Pinene (0.8%-1%)
Terpinen-4-ol (35.4%-41%)
α-Terpinene (9.9%-11.4%)
γ-Terpinene (20.3%-22.6%)
α-Terpineol (2.6%-2.9%)
Terpinolene (3.3%-3.7%)
α-Thuyene (1%-1.1%)
Deters These Pests: 
Fleas

Addendum(s)
 Tea Tree and Silver
"Tea tree oil and silver ions (Ag+) exerted a synergistic effect against Candida albicans..." - Antifungal Investigations on Plant Essential Oils. A Review

Open Source PDF Documents for Tea Tree
 
1. A Novel Method to Estimate the Contribution of the Vapor Activity of Essential Oils
2. Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils Against Respiratory Tract Pathogens
3. Antidermatophytic Activity of Essential Oils
4. Antifungal activity of Plant Oils against Oral Clinical Isolates of Candida
5. Antifungal Investigations on Plant Essential Oils. A Review
6. Antimicrobial Action of Essential Oils: The Effect of DSMO on Cinnamon Oil
7. Antimicrobial and Synergistic Effects of some Essential Oils to Fight Pathogens
8. Antimicrobial Effects of Tea Tree Oil on Staphylococcus aureus
9. Blessed by Essential Oils - Simple Guidelines and Uses of Essential Oils
10. Case History of Infected Eczema Treated with Essential Oils
11. Chemistry and Biological Activities of Essential Oils from Melaleuca Species
12. Chemistry and Biological Activities of Oil from Melaleuca L. Species
13. Clinical Phytotherapy for Women's Health
14. Essential Oils as Modifiers of Rumen Microbial Fermentation
15. Essential Oils as Therapeutics
 
16. Essential Oils Isolated from Myrtaceae Family as Natural Insecticides
17. Essential Oils with Antibacterial, Antifungal, Antiviral, Cytotoxic Properties
18. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Activity of a Sizable Set of Essential Oils
19. Immune-Modifying and Antimicrobial Effects of Eucalyptus Oil
20. Immunological and Psychological Benefits of Aromatherapy Massage
21. In Vitro and in Vivo Killing of Ocular Demodex by Tea Tree Oil
22. In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil
23. Incorporating Essential Oils into Clinical Dentistry
24. Nanoencapsulation of Essential Oils with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity
25. Pharmaceutical and Therapeutic Potentials of Essential Oils
26. Screening of Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activity of Tea Tree Essential Oils
27. Tea Tree Oil - Determining the Antimicrobial Actions
28. Tea Tree Oil: A Review of Antimicrobial & Other Medicinal Properties
29. The Potential Effectiveness of Essential Oils as a Treatment for Head Lice


 
Tea Tree (Lemon) -- Leptospermum petersonii  --- Please see Manuka (Lemon)
 


 
Tea Tree (Mexican) -- Chenopodium ambrosioides  --- Please see Wormseed
 


 
Tea Tree (White) -- Melaleuca cajuputi  --- Please see Cajeput
 


 
Tejpat -- Cinnamomum tamala  --- Please see Tamala
 


 
Thuja -- Thuja occidentalis  --- Please see Cedarwood (Atlas)
 Note: This oil has a high Thujone content and is considered somewhat poisonous, especially in high doses or repeated use. Thujone is a neurotoxin which can cause convulsions, gastro-enteritis, and abortions due to reflex uterine contractions. It should rarely be used for health issues, however, and rarely be allowed to touch the skin. An occational single drop on a wart is about the only use that I would give it. Sometimes Cedarwood oil is a practical alternative.
 

Cautions: 
Keep-Away-From-Children     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)     Skin-Irritant(high)     Use-With-Extreme-Caution
Health Uses: 
Warts  
Oil Constituents
Thujone 

 
Thyme -- Thymus vulgaris Latin AliasOleum Thymi
French NameThym  German NameThymian  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Lamiales, Family: Lamiaceae, Genus: Thymus L.   Specie: Thymus vulgaris  L.
Etymology:  Thymus - Greek word for soul, mind, will         vulgaris - Common
From: England  France  USA 
 Recommended Dilution: High Note: Middle Astral Bodies: Mars   Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: Middle-Top Polarity: Yang     Element: Fire Plant Height: 15-20 cm
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point: 123-125° F      Plant Part: Whole Plant
 Specific Gravity: 0.870 - 0.940Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Warm Resinous Scent
Approaches: 
Infusion  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Glaucoma(Avoid-if-have-Glaucoma)     Keep-Away-From-Children     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)     Skin-Irritant(high)     Use-Sparingly     Use-With-Extreme-Caution
Health Uses: 
Acne   Asthma   Bronchitis   Candida   Colds   Cystitis   Dermatitis   Dyspepsia   E. coli   Headaches   Indigestion   Insomnia   Laryngitis   Rheumatism   Scabies   Tonsillitis   Tuberculosis   Urinary Tract Infections   Viruses   Warts   Whooping Cough   Wounds  
Emotional States: 
Stress (Physical)
Properties: 
Anti-bacterial   Anti-biotic   Anti-catarrh   Anti-fungal   Anti-microbial   Anti-parasitic   Anti-rheumatic   Anti-septic-general   Anti-viral   Nervine   Tonic-cardiac   Vulnerary  
Oil Constituents
Carvacrol  Linalol  Thymol 
Deters These Pests: 
Beetle (bean)   Cutworms   Mosquitoes   Ticks

Open Source PDF Documents for Thyme
 
1. A Controlled Trial of Aromatherapy for Nursing Home Patients with Dementia
2. A Novel Method to Estimate the Contribution of the Vapor Activity of Essential Oils
3. Anti-Candida Activity of Thyme Lemon and Pennyroyal
4. Antibacterial Activity of Thymus vulgaris Essential Oil
5. Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils Against Respiratory Tract Pathogens
6. Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils: Potential Application in Food
7. Antidermatophytic Activity of Essential Oils
8. Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils and their Synergy with Fluconazole
9. Antifungal activity of Plant Oils against Oral Clinical Isolates of Candida
10. Antifungal Investigations on Plant Essential Oils. A Review
11. Antimicrobial Action of Essential Oils: The Effect of DSMO on Cinnamon Oil
12. Antimicrobial Agents from Plants: Antibacterial Activity of Plant Oils
13. Antimicrobial Agents from Plants: Antibacterial Activity of Plant Volatile Oils
14. Antimicrobial and Synergistic Effects of some Essential Oils to Fight Pathogens
15. Antimicrobial Properties of Some Essential Oils against Pathogenic Microorganisms
16. Antioxidant and Free Radical Scavenging Activities of Essential Oils
17. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils of Ten Plants
18. Chemical Composition and Antifungal Activity of Plant Essential Oils
19. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activity of Thymus vulgaris
20. Chemical Composition of Essential Oil of Thymus vulgaris
 
21. Comparative Sporicidal Effects of Volatile Oils
22. Das Verhalten der Bacterien des Fleischwassers gegen einige Antiseptica
23. Effect of Soil Type and Irrigation Intervals on Growth of Thymus vulgaris
24. Essential Oils and Hypertension
25. Essential Oils as Modifiers of Rumen Microbial Fermentation
26. Essential Oils in Combination and Their Antimicrobial Properties
27. Essential Oils with Antibacterial, Antifungal, Antiviral, Cytotoxic Properties
28. Essential Oils: Their Antibacterial Properties and Potential Application in Food
29. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Activity of a Sizable Set of Essential Oils
30. Influence of Growing Location and Variety on the Oil Content of Melissa and Thyme
31. Inhibitory Effect of Essential Oils Against Herpes
32. Investigation on Antibacterial Synergism of Oregano and Thyme Essential Oils
33. Nanoencapsulation of Essential Oils with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity
34. Plant-based Insect Repellents: A Review of their Efficacy and Testing
35. Repellent Activities of Essential Oils and Monoterpenes Against Mosquitoes
36. Synergistic Antibacterial Effect of Myrtle and Thyme Essential Oils
37. Synergistic Interactions of Lavender Essential Oil
38. The Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils Grown in Ash shoubak
39. The Potential Effectiveness of Essential Oils as a Treatment for Head Lice


 
Tolu balsam -- Myroxylon balsamum  --- Please see Balsam de Tolu
 


 
Tonka Bean -- Dipteryx odorata   aka:  Coumarouna odorata    ---      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 
French Name: Fèves de Tonka  German Name: Tonkabohnen  

Tonka Bean absolute comes from the beans of the Tonka tree which grows in Mexico, Central America, South America and Nigeria. The tree is a member of the Fabaceae family. The beans themselves have many traditional uses in their native lands, however, the essential oil extract is too toxic for use in aromatherapy.(Aromatherapy: A Complete Guide to the Healing Art  pg 41) Some sources suggest that the oil should never be used on the skin or only in a very diluted state. I have read that Tonka Bean oil is a dermal toxin but I currently cannot confirm that. Tonka Bean absolute is said to have a 20% to 45% coumarin content (Bo Jensen's Website) and that is certainly one cause for concern with this oil and perhaps the reason why it is said to be toxic to the skin.

The sweet base note scent of Tonka Bean absolute is the main attraction here and the oil is used in perfumes (both as a fixative and for the scent) and as an additive to flavor tobacco so it is used on the skin and even inhaled into the lungs, although likely in very small quantities.

In addition, Tonka Bean absolute does contain Vanillin so it might be used as an ingredient in mosquito repellent, though such a mosquito repellent would not be recommended for use on the skin. It's non-skin use and the high price of Tonka Bean absolute are two reasons why using Vanilla oil might be a better idea here.

I have also read that Tonka Bean absolute is great at repelling moths though I have no personal experience with that.

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Tonquin Bean -- Dipteryx odorata  --- Please see Tonka Bean
 


 
Toothpick Weed -- Ammi visnaga  --- Please see Khella
 


 
Tuberose -- Polianthes tuberosa
French NameTubérose  German NameTuberose  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Liliopsida, Order: Liliales, Family: Agavaceae, Genus: Polianthes L.   Specie: Polianthes tuberosa  L.
From: Hawaii  India  Mexico 
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Top Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 1 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 2 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/E
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Flowers
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Light Floral Scent
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption
Properties: 
Aphrodisiac  
Oil Constituents
Eugenol  Farnesol  Geraniol  Methyl salicylate  Nerol 

Abstract: 
As far as I can tell this oil does not necessarily have specific health uses though I have read that the Aztecs thought of it as a medicine. Its used extensively in the perfume industry. Furthermore, the genuine, authentic essential oil is one of the most expensive on the market. With these two factors in mind it seems that it would be one of the most likely oils to be synthetically produced in a lab and sold off as "the real deal" to consumers. Buyers beware.

Open Source PDF Document for Tuberose: 
1. Floral Essential Oils: Importance and Uses for Mankind


 
Turmeric -- Curcuma longa
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Liliopsida, Order: Zingiberales, Family: Zingiberaceae, Genus: Curcuma L.   Specie: Curcuma longa  L.
From: India  Nigeria  Thailand 
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Base Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Rhizomes
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches: 
Bath  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Skin-Irritant(mild)
Health Uses: 
Anemia   Cancer (General)   Diabetes   Dyspepsia   Food Poisoning   Gallstones   Indigestion   Staph Infections   Wounds  
Properties: 
Analgesic   Anti-bacterial   Anti-fungal   Anti-inflammatory   Anti-septic-general   Anti-spasmodic   Astringent   Carminative   Cholagogues   Diuretic   Stimulant-general   Vulnerary  
Deters These Pests: 
Cockroaches   Mosquitoes

Open Source PDF Documents for Turmeric
 
1. A Review on Antidermatophytic Efficiency of Plant Essential Oils
2. Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils: Potential Application in Food
3. Antifungal Investigations on Plant Essential Oils. A Review
4. Antinociceptive Activity of Curcuma longa Essential Oil
5. Chemical Composition of Essential Oil Isolated from Curcuma longa L. Leaves
6. Chemical Composition of Rhizome Essential Oil of Curcuma longa L.
7. Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Essential Oils from Curcuma Rhizome
8. Curcuma longa and Curcumin: A Review Article
9. Early Human Safety Study of Turmeric Oil Administered Orally
 
10. Major Constituents in Oils of Curcuma longa L. and Curcuma aromatica
11. Mosquito Knock-down and Adulticidal Activities of Essential Oils by Various Methods
12. Mosquito Repellents in Thailand
13. Phytochemistry and Pharmacology of Plants from the Ginger Family, Zingiberaceae
14. Plant-based Insect Repellents: A Review of their Efficacy and Testing
15. Repellent Activity of Essential Oils Against Cockroaches in Thailand
16. Rhizome and Leaf Oil Composition of Curcuma longa from Northern India
17. Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Curcumins and Oil from Turmeric


 
Turpentine -- Pinus sylvestris   aka:  Pinus austriaca , Pinus pinaster    ---
      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 This oil was sometimes used in the past and has the Latin alias of Oleum Terebinthinae

This essential oil is obtained from the resin of the Scotch Pine tree. It is distinctly different from Scotch Pine essential oil which is obtained from the needles. Although Turpentine is known to have some medicinal value it is a strong irritant to the skin and mucous membranes and most aromatherapists and massage practitioners would not recommend using it for health purposes. Residents of Britian, Finland, Sweden, Germany, and Russia who seek the medicinal properties of turpentine would do better to simply take a walk through the forest and enjoy the resinous scents in the air.

According to Edward Kremer (The Volatile Oils  pdf pg 236), Turpentine can be obtained by several species of Pinus:

  Pinus anstralis - American Turpentine
Pinus taeda - American Turpentine
Pinus cubensis - American Turpentine
Pinus palustris - American Turpentine
Pinus pinaster - French Turpentine
Pinus laricio - Australian Turpentine
Pinus ledebourii - Russian Turpentine
Pinus kyasya - Burma Turpentine
Pinus sabiniana - Californian Turpentine

Turpentine is well known for its use as a paint thinner and perhaps should best be left for that purpose. To quote Kremers (The Volatile Oils):

  "Of physiological interest is the fact that turpentine oil, when taken internally, or when the vapors are but inhaled, imparts to the urine a peculiar violet odor. This peculiarity is shared by all pinene-containing oils. Other terpenes do not possess this property. The inhalation of the vapors of turpentine oil for a longer period produces an unpleasant affection of the kidneys known as painter's disease."

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Valerian -- Valeriana officinalis   aka:  Valeriana wallachi , Valeriana fauriei Latin AliasOleum Valerianae
French NameValériane  Spanish NameNancu Lahuen  German NameBaldrianwurzel  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Dipsacales, Family: Valerianaceae, Genus: Valeriana L.   Specie: Valeriana officinalis  L.
From: Canada  China  India  USA U.S. Growth Region: 3-4
Recommended Dilution: High Note: Base Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity: Yin     Element: Earth Plant Height: 1-2 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Root
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Keep-Away-From-Children     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)
Health Uses: 
Epilipsy   Headaches   Insomnia   Muscle Aches   Muscle Spasms  
Emotional States: 
Irritation (Mental)   Panic   Stress (Emotional)
Properties: 
Sedative  
Oil Constituents
Valepotrits  Valeranone  Valereal  Valerenic acid  Valerianol 
Deters These Pests: 
Mice / Rat Attractant

Addendum(s)
 Note
Said to be a better attractant for cats than Catnip!  

Note 2
For those interested in Valerian as it relates to epilipsy please seek works written by Fabio Colonna as he was said to have cured his epilipsy with Valerian. A second source Using Plants for Healing (Using Plants for Healing pg 218) also mentions that, when used properly, Valerian has a "considerable reputation as a treatment for epilepsy".

Note 3
Valerian is said to be a strong attractant for mice and rats. Supposedly, the secret of the Pied Piper of Hamelin was the Valerian root in his pocket...

Open Source PDF Documents for Valerian
 
1. Chemical Analysis of Essential Oils of Two Valerianaceous Species from China
2. Essential Oil of Valerian officinalis L. Roots From Estonia
 
3. Essential Oils From Normal and Hairy Roots of Valeriana officinalis
4. Evaluation of Medicinal Plant Valerian Essential Oil Compositions


 
Vanilla -- Vanilla planifolia   aka:  Vanilla aromatica
French NameVanille  German NameVanille  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Liliopsida, Order: Orchidales, Family: Orchidaceae, Genus: Vanilla Mill.   Specie: Vanilla planifolia  Jacks.
Etymology:  Vanilla - A sheath         planifolia - Flat leafed
 From: C. America  Mexico  Réunion Island 
 Recommended Dilution: Any Note: Base Astral Bodies: Saturn  Sun  Venus   Plant Catagory: Vine
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: Base-Middle Polarity: Yin     Element: Water Plant Height: 2-5 cm
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: Love  Lust   Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Beans
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Warm Spicy Scent
Approaches: 
Candles  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Health Uses: 
Impotence  
Properties: 
Aphrodisiac  
Oil Constituents
Methyl salicylate  Vanillin 
Deters These Pests: 
Mosquitoes

Abstract: 
Bourbon Vanilla is the finest quality Vanilla and is normally obtained via CO2 extraction. Its considerably more expensive but often worth it. There is a huge demand for Vanillin, so, often, Vanilla oil is produced synthetically. Finding a source of authentic, genuine Vanilla oil might be difficult. This may pose a problem, especially if you desire vanillin for use as an additive to a mosquito repellent.

If Vanilla was being adulterated back in 1922 then imagine what's going on with it today... According to George William Askinson:

"In the strict sense there is no essential oil of vanilla, the flavoring principle being a crystalline substance, vanillin, which is present to the extent of about 2% in the best grades of Mexican beans. It (vanillin) has a melting point of 76° C. Vanillin is now (1922) made artificially from the Eugenol of oil of cloves as well as by other methods and is equivalent to approximately forty times its weight of vanilla beans. It is pure white and crystalline, and represents the flavoring principle of vanilla beans, entirely free from inert material."   (Perfumes and Cosmetics their Preparation and Manufacture 5th Ed.  pg 136)

Addendum(s)
 Note
Be aware that Vanilla oil and Tonka Bean oil by themselves are not necessarily mosquito repellents. However, the chemical constituent Vanillin which is present in Vanilla oil and Tonka Bean oil is said to be a critical component needed in a blend with other essential oils to create effective mosquito repellents. For details please see the following article: Mosquito Repellents in Thailand Furthermore, be aware that there are different species of mosquitoes. Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Anopheles dirus, and Culex quinquefasciatus are 4 common types. Determine the mosquito species in your area to help create an effective repellent against them.

Note 2
Vanilla oil is commonly used as an ingredient in baking and as a pharmaceutical flavoring agent. In addition it is used in tobacco products and some perfumes.

Open Source PDF Document for Vanilla: 
1. Mosquito Repellents in Thailand


 
Vanilla (Bourbon Type) -- Vanilla planifolia  --- Please see Vanilla
 Note: An excellent variety of Vanilla! Expect a slightly higher price... It's cultivated and produced on Réunion Island (French Territory) located in the Indian Ocean east of Madagascar. Réunion Island used to be known as "Bourbon", hence the name "Bourbon Type".
 


 
Vanilla Leaf -- Carphephorus odoratissimus  --- Please see Deer Tongue
 


 
Vetiver -- Vetiveria zizanoides   aka:  Andropogon zizanioides , Chrysopogon zizanioides Latin AliasOleum Ivaranchusae
French NameVétyver  German NameVetiverwurzel  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Liliopsida, Order: Cyperales, Family: Poaceae, Genus: Vetiveria L.   Specie: Vetiveria zizanoides  L.
From: Brazil  Comoro Islands  India  Indonesia  Java  Philippines  Réunion Island 
Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Base Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Perennial
Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: Base-Middle Polarity     Element Plant Height: 100-150 cm
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: Luck  Protection   Extraction: S/D, CO2
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Root
 Specific Gravity: 1.007Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image 
Approaches: 
Bath  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-First-Trimester)
Health Uses: 
Acne   Anemia   Anorexia   Arthritis (Rheumatoid)   Cuts   Dry Skin   Impotence   Insomnia   Jet Lag   Muscle Aches   Muscle Pain   Oily Skin   Rheumatism   Sprains  
Emotional States: 
Depression   Stress (Emotional)
Properties: 
Anti-depressant   Anti-infectious   Anti-septic-general   Anti-spasmodic   Aphrodisiac   Calmative   Fixative   Rubefacient   Sedative   Stimulant-circulatory   Stimulant-immune-system  
Oil Constituents
γ-Cadinene  Khusimol  Vetiverol  α-Vetivone  β-Vetivone  Vitivene  Vitiverone 
Deters These Pests: 
Cockroaches   Flies (black)   Moths

Abstract: 
Vetiver from Réunion Island is known for its rose-type scent and is highly valued by the perfume industry while Vetiver from India is generally known for its woody-type scent.

Vetiver is one of the best known fixatives. Because of this it is used extensively in the perfume industry. "Vetiver oil is the basis of the Indian perfume 'Majmua' and is the major ingredient in some 36% of all western perfumes, such as Caleche, Chanel, Dioressence, Parue, Opium, Guerlain, Christian Dior, Givenchy (Dowthwaite and Rajani 2000) and 20% of all men's fragrances." (University of New South Wales PhD Thesis Proposal (Vetiver & Vetivone)  pdf pg. 11)

Open Source PDF Documents for Vetiver
 
1. Antioxidant and Free Radical Scavenging Activities of Essential Oils
2. Aromatherapy in the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders
3. Essential Oil Interventions for Premenstrual Syndrome and the Menopause
4. Evaluation of Aromatic Plants Used to Fight Multidrug Resistant Infections
5. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Activity of a Sizable Set of Essential Oils
 
6. In vitro Antibacterial Activity of Some Plant Essential Oils
7. Other Uses, and Utilization of Vetiver: Vetiver Oil
8. The Utilization of Vetiver as Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
9. University of New South Wales PhD Thesis Proposal (Vetiver & Vetivone)
10. Vetiver Oil and Its Sedative Effect


 
Vetivert -- Vetiveria zizanoides  --- Please see Vetiver
 


 
Violet -- Viola odorata
French NameViolette  German NameVeilchenblüthen  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Violales, Family: Violaceae, Genus: Viola L.   Specie: Viola odorata  L.
Etymology:  Viola - The violet         odorata - Sweet smelling
From: Egypt  England  France  Greece  Italy 
 Recommended Dilution: High Note: Top Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity: Yin     Element: Water Plant Height: 20-30 cm
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 2 yrs Magical Powers: Love  Lust   Extraction: CO2,S/E,S/E/E
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Flowers
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Not-For-Internal-Consumption

Addendum(s)
 Alias(es)
Also known as "Corents of April".


 
Vitex -- Vitex agnus-castus   aka:  Vitex negundo Latin AliasOleum Viticis Negundo
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Lamiales, Family: Verbenaceae, Genus: Vitex L.   Specie: Vitex agnus-castus  L.
Etymology:  Vitex - Latin vitilis - made by plaiting         agnus-castus - Greek - lamb-chaste
 From: India  Mediteranean  Turkey U.S. Growth Region: 5-6-7-8
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Top Astral Bodies: Mars  Moon  Pluto   Plant Catagory: Tree
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity: Yin     Element: Air Plant Height: 3-5 m
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 2 yrs Magical Powers: Chastity   Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Berries
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)
Health Uses: 
Cystitis   Herpes   Infertility (Female)   Menopause   Menstration (Irregular)   Menstration (PMS)   Wounds  
Properties: 
Anaphrodisiac   Aphrodisiac   Diuretic   Emmenagogues   Febrifuge   Galactagogue   Sedative   Stomachic   Vulnerary  
Oil Constituents
β-Caryophyllene (39%)  

Addendum(s)
 Caution
Men beware!! This oil will cause nausea, headaches, hormonal imbalances... Although this oil has been shown to solve all varieties of womens problems it is clearly not for men.

Caution 2
Women beware!! This oil can often CANCEL OUT birth control pills. In addition, anyone on Hormone Replacement Therapy needs to watch closely if you decide to use Vitex.

Note
Vitex has been listed in various sources as both an Aphrodisiac and an Anaphrodisiac. So, which is it?

Open Source PDF Documents for Vitex
 
1. In vitro Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils Against Isolates from HIV Patients
2. Optimising Fertility with Essential Oils
 
3. Variation in Essential Oil Yield and Composition of Cretan Vitex Fruits
4. Variations in Essential Oils of Vitex agnus castus Fruits


 
Wild Mint -- Mentha sylvestris  --- Please see Horsemint
 


 
Wintergreen -- Gaultheria procumbens Latin AliasOleum Gaultheriae
French NameGaulthérie  German NameWintergrünblätter  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Ericales, Family: Ericaceae, Genus: Gaultheria L.   Specie: Gaultheria procumbens  L.
Etymology:  Gaultheria - In honor of Jean Gaulthier (1708-1758), a Canadian botanist         procumbens - Falling forward -or- face down
 From: Canada  Nepal  USA 
 Recommended Dilution: High Note: Middle Astral Bodies: Moon  Saturn  Venus   Plant Catagory: Shrub
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: Middle-Top Polarity: Yin     Element: Water Plant Height: 15-20 cm
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: Protection   Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Flowers/Leaves
 Specific Gravity: 1.173 - 1.180Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Light Minty Scent
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Cummulative-Effects     Keep-Away-From-Children     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)     Skin-Irritant(medium)     Toxic-When-Taken-Internally     Use-Sparingly     Use-With-Extreme-Caution
Health Uses: 
Arthritis (Rheumatoid)   Asthma   Colds   Coughs   Gout   Indigestion   Menstration (Irregular)   Menstration (PMS)   Muscle Aches   Muscle Cramps   Muscle Spasms   Respiratory Infections   Rheumatism   Sinus Infections   Sprains   Water Retention  
Properties: 
Analgesic   Anti-inflammatory   Anti-septic-general   Astringent   Carminative   Diuretic   Emmenagogues   Healing   Rubefacient  
Oil Constituents
Methyl salicylate 

Abstract: 
It is commonly said that essentially all "Birch oil" (both "Sweet Birch" &  "White Birch") and "Wintergreen oil" on the consumer market is in fact synthetic methyl salicylate. Methyl salicylate has been repeatedly shown to cause poisoning and dermal eruptions. Applied to the skin methyl salicylate enters the body extremely quickly and has even been detected in urine only 30 minutes after topical application in lab experiments. People with aspirin, heparin, ticlopidine, or warfarin (Coumadin) in their system who are exposed to methyl salicylate risk internal hemorrhage. -- (Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Healthcare Professionals)

Other sources such as those associated with Gary Young suggest that Birch and Wintergreen oil play an important part in aromatherapy and are likely referring to the genuine, authentic oils, not synthetics.

At this time it is difficult (for me) to tell whether or not Birch and Wintergreen oils should be used in aromatherapy. Regardless of the side you choose keep in mind the following ideas:
1. Pharmaceutical companies or other chemical companies are the ones responsible for the creation of synthetic Birch and Wintergreen oil.
2. Pharmaceutical companies or other chemical companies are the ones responsible for creating aspirin, heparin, ticlopidine, and warfarin (Coumadin).
3. Pharmaceutical companies or other chemical companies are the ones responsible for creating fear about using Birch and Wintergreen oils. Of course this fear is reasonable if we are talking about synthetic Birch and Wintergreen oils.

Addendum(s)
 Caution
Most bottles of "Wintergreen" oil on the market actually contain birch oil or they are commonly 100% synthetic - mostly methyl salicylate. Because of this, Wintergreen oil is not recommended for most aromatherapy applications.

Open Source PDF Documents for Wintergreen
 
1. Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils Against Respiratory Tract Pathogens
2. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Activity of a Sizable Set of Essential Oils
 
3. In vitro Antibacterial Activity of Some Plant Essential Oils


 
Wormseed -- Chenopodium ambrosioides   aka:  Artemisia maritima    ---      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 
Spanish Name: Paico macho  

Wormseed should never be used in aromatherapy. A tiny amount of exposure to the oil will likely cause damage to the kidneys and liver and could even be fatal for some people. At a minimum expect vomiting, vertigo, deafness, and/or visual impairment.

Native Americans were known to use the herb, not the oil, the herb to expel worms.

Wormseed oil is explosive when heated or mixed with certain acids.

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Wormwood -- Artemisia absinthium   aka:  Artemisia pontica , Artemisia capillaris    ---
      Extracted oil from this plant is not used in aromatherapy.  

 This oil was sometimes used in the past and has the Latin alias of Oleum Absinthii

Spanish Name: Ajenjo  

Common Wormwood oil comes from Artemisia absinthium. Roman Wormword oil comes from Artemisia pontica. Capillary Wormwood oil comes from Artemisia capillaris.

Wormwood oil is a toxin, neurotoxin, and an abortifacient. In the distant past Wormwood, most likely just the herb itself, has been used for many health issues such as reducing fever, promoting menstration, a remedy for anorexia, and used to expel worms. Wormwood essential oil is much, much more concentrated than the herb, however, and it should never be used in aromatherapy.


Wormwood oil contains a very, very high concentration of Thujone. Thujone is somewhat poisonous, especially in high doses or with repeated use. Thujone is a neurotoxin and β-Thujone in particular is an epileptiform convulsant. Exposure to high concentrations of Thujone via inhalation, topical application on the skin, or internal consumption can cause convulsions, tremors, paralysis, gastro-enteritis, vomiting, and abortions due to reflex uterine contractions and uterine bleeding. Essential oils containing Thujone in low percentages should be used with caution and respect and never be allowed to touch the skin undiluted. Essential oils with high concentrations of Thujone, such as Wormwood, should never be used in aromatherapy.

The liquor known as "Absinthe" is derived from this plant and was first produced in mass sometime around 1805. Continuous consumption of Absinthe is widely known to cause addiction, hyper-excitability, hallucinations, and in extreme cases brain damage. Most books usually insert comments here about the love affairs that famous artists and writers have had with Absinthe such as Oscar Wilde, Henri Toulousse-Lautrec, and of course, Vincent van Gogh. Because of these and other similar historical occurances, it was banned in France in 1915 and later in other European countries as well.

More recently in 1988 Absinthe was re-legalized in the European Union. In theory, Absinthe from 1805 to 1915 had very high Thujone concentrations while the Thujone concentration in the modernized version of Absinthe (post 1988) is much lower. The reality is, both versions of Absinthe contain about the same amount of Thujone! Please see the excellent study published by the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Chemical Composition of Vintage Preban Absinthe

The alcoholic drink Vermouth consists of white wine and herbs, one of which is Wormwood.

According to Aromatherapy Science (page 83), a man purchased Wormwood essential oil on the Internet thinking that it was the same thing as the drink known as Absinthe. He then swallowed 10ml and acute renal failure (kidney failure) and rhabdomyolysis (spinal deterioration) followed shortly thereafter.

Traditionally the Wormword herb was popular for its use in expelling intestinal worms which is likely where it derived its name from.

A list of other oils which should not be used in aromatherapy can be viewed here -- Unused Essential Oils In Aromatherapy
 


 
Xanthoxylum -- Zanthoxylum armatum
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Sapindales, Family: Rutaceae, Genus: Zanthoxylum L.   Specie: Zanthoxylum armatum  Roxb.
From: Nepal 
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Middle Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 2
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Fruit
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Sweet Fruity Scent
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption
Health Uses: 
Colds   Muscle Aches   Muscle Pain   Respiratory Infections   Respiratory Tract Infections  
Emotional States: 
Depression
Properties: 
Analgesic   Anti-depressant   Anti-inflammatory   Anti-septic-general   Anti-spasmodic   Sedative   Stimulant-digestive   Stimulant-immune-system  
Deters These Pests: 
Cats

Open Source PDF Documents for Xanthoxylum
 
1. Essential and Fixed Oils of Skimmia laureola and Zanthoxylum armatum
2. GC-MS analysis of hexane extract of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. Fruits
 
3. Studies on the Components of Essential Oil of Zanthoxylum armatum by GC-MS


 
Yarrow -- Achillea millefolium Latin AliasOleum Achillea Millefolium
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Asterales, Family: Asteraceae, Genus: Achillea L.   Specie: Achillea millefolium  L.
Etymology:  Achillea - Named after the God Achilles because this plant was used to heal his wounds         millefolium - A thousand flowers
 From: Africa  China  Germany  Hungary  N. America 
 Recommended Dilution: High Note: Middle Astral Bodies: Venus   Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity: Yin     Element: Water Plant Height: 50-100 cm
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: Love   Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point: 121-123° F      Plant Part: Flowers
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Sweet Earthy Scent
Approaches: 
Suppository  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Always-Dilute     Asthma(Avoid-if-have-Asthma)     Keep-Away-From-Children     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)     Skin-Irritant(medium)     Use-Sparingly
Health Uses: 
Acne   Burns   Cellulite   Colds   Eczema   Fever   Flatulence   Gout   Hair Loss   Headaches   Hemorrhoids   Hypertension   Indigestion   Kidney Stones   Menopause   Prostate (General Problems)   Rheumatism   Sprains   Sunburns   Ulcers   Urinary Tract Infections   Varicose Veins   Wounds  
Properties: 
Anti-inflammatory   Anti-septic-general   Aphrodisiac   Astringent   Diuretic   Galactagogue   Vulnerary  
Oil Constituents
Azulene (2.2%-3.5%)
Bornyl acetate (0%-2.6%)
Camphor (1%-4.4%)
β-Caryophyllene (3.2%-12.8%)
Chamazulene
1,8 Cineole (3.9%-22.1%)
Lavandulyl acetate (0%-1.3%)
Limonene (0%-1.6%)
β-Myrcene (0%-9.2%)
α-Pinene (2.4%-3.9%)
β-Pinene (10.2%-15%)
Sabinene (22.1%-31.4%)
Terpinen-4-ol (0.8%-3.2%)
α-Terpinene (0%-0.6%)
γ-Terpinene (0.6%-2.6%)
α-Terpineol (0.5%-2.4%)

Abstract: 
To produce a very robust Yarrow essential oil, use plants that have exposure to the most intense sunlight. The more sunlight, the richer the oil.

Open Source PDF Documents for Yarrow
 
1. An Ascaridole Containing Essential Oil of the Achillea millefolium
2. Antimicrobial Effects of Yarrow Essential Oil
3. Antioxidant Property of Volatile Oils Determined by the Ferric Reducing Ability
 
4. Essential Oil Composition of Achillea millefolium L. Cultivated in India
5. Secondary Metabolites of Essential Oil of Achillea millefolium


 
Ylang Ylang -- Cananga odorata Latin AliasOleum Unonae Odoratissimae
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Magnoliales, Family: Annonaceae, Genus: Cananga L.   Specie: Cananga odorata  Lam.
Etymology:  Cananga - Flower of flowers         odorata - Sweet smelling
From: Comoro Islands  India  Indonesia  Madagascar  Malaysia  Philippines  Réunion Island  Tahiti 
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Base Astral Bodies: Venus   Plant Catagory: Tree
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: Base-Middle Polarity: Yin     Element: Earth Plant Height: 10-12 m
Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Flowers
 Specific Gravity: 0.980Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches: 
Candles  
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Low-Blood-Pressure(Avoid-if-you-have-LBP)     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-First-Trimester)     Skin-Irritant(mild)     Use-Sparingly
Health Uses: 
Dementia   Diabetes   Hair Loss   High Blood Pressure   Hypertension   Impotence   Infections   Insomnia  
Emotional States: 
Anxiety   Depression   Fear   Shock
Properties: 
Anti-depressant   Anti-infectious   Anti-septic-general   Anti-spasmodic   Nervine   Sedative   Tonic-general  
Oil Constituents
Benzoic acid  Linalol  Methyl cresol  Methyl salicylate 

Abstract: 
Ylang Ylang flowers mature 2-3 weeks after the buds have opened. The mature flowers are collected in the early morning and usually steam distilled on location (or as soon as possible) to obtain the best oil. The highest quality oil is often referred to as "Ylang Ylang Extra". The flowers are usually steam distilled repeatedly; the second distillation rendering the oil known as "Ylang Ylang 1", the third distillation rendering the oil known as "Ylang Ylang 2", the fourth distillation rendering the oil known as "Ylang Ylang 3".

About 35-40 kilograms of Ylang Ylang flowers yield about 1 Kilogram of oil. The average Ylang Ylang tree yields about 10 Kilograms of flowers each year.

High concentrations of this oil has been known to cause headaches, nausea, or both.

Addendum(s)
 Common Name Etymology
Ylang Ylang or ilang-ilang in Indonesian means "loosely hanging" in reference to the flowers

Open Source PDF Documents for Ylang Ylang
 
1. A Brief on the Use of Essential Oils with Traditional Chinese Medicine
2. Aromatherapy in Pregnancy
3. Aromatherapy in the Management of Psychiatric Disorders
4. Essential Oils as Anti-Protozoal Agents
5. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Activity of a Sizable Set of Essential Oils
6. Floral Essential Oils: Importance and Uses for Mankind
7. Improvement of Ylang-Ylang Essential Oil Characterization by GC-GC-TOFMS
8. Modulation of Cognitive Performance and Mood by Aromas of Peppermint, Ylang-Ylang
 
9. Olivia's Essential Oils Guide for Dummies
10. The Role of Essential Oils in the Treatment and Management of ADHD
11. Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, and Bioactivities of Cananga odorata
12. Versatile Psychophysiological Potencies of Essential Oils
13. Water-Steam Distillation and Solvent Extraction of Cananga odorata
14. Ylang Ylang Oil - The Essential Oil of the Flowers of Canaga odorata
15. Ylang-Ylang Oil Production in Madagascar and the Comoros
16. Ylang-ylang: une Plante a Huile Essentielle Meconnue dans une Filiere en Danger


 
Yuzu -- Citrus junos
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Sapindales, Family: Rutaceae, Genus: Citrus L.   Specie: Citrus junos  L.
From: China  Japan  South Korea  Tibet 
 Recommended Dilution: Low Note: Top Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Tree
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge: None Polarity     Element Plant Height: 2-4 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 2 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: C/P
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Fruit Peel
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption
Health Uses: 
Asthma   Bronchitis  
Emotional States: 
Stress (Emotional)   Stress (Mental)   Stress (Physical)
Properties: 
Anti-fungal   Anti-inflammatory  
Oil Constituents
Limonene  α-Pinene 
Deters These Pests: 
Cats

Abstract: 
An excellent reference for the properties of Yuzu can be found online here:
      http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2010.01541.x/full

Addendum(s)
 Adulteration Risks
Be aware that there are products on the market claiming to be "Yuzu" but are nothing more than a mix of other, cheaper Rutaceae oils.

Note
There is also an essential oil that is derived from the leaves of this tree. Information about such an oil can be found in the book Essential oil of the leaves of Citrus junos by N. A. Kekelidze and M. I. Dzhanikashvili.

Open Source PDF Documents for Yuzu
 
1. Aromatic Effects of a Japanese Citrus Fruit - Yuzu
2. Chemical and Aroma Profiles of Yuzu Peel Oils of Different Cultivars
 
3. Study on Essential Oils from Four Species of Zhishi with GC-MS


 
Yuzu Absolute -- Citrus junos  --- Please see Yuzu
 Note: Yuzu Absolute is distilled by solvent extraction. The process of solvent extraction commonly uses hexane and petroleum ether and these chemicals often leave a residue in the resulting rose oil. Every attempt is made to recover the hexane and petroleum ether for re-use, however, a small residue of about 1-10 parts per million is commonly found in Yuzu Absolute. Because of the environmental hazards involved and the trace amounts of volatile chemical residue Yuzu Absolute is not as popular in aromatherapy as Yuzu which is extracted via cold expression of the rind which produces a pale yellow essential oil.
 


 
Zdravetz -- Geranium macrorrhizum
Spanish NameCore Core  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Magnoliopsida, Order: Geraniales, Family: Geraniaceae, Genus: Geranium L.   Specie: Geranium macrorrhizum  L.
From: Bulgaria 
 Recommended Dilution: Mid Note: Base Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Annual
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge Polarity     Element Plant Height: 1 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Flowers/Leaves/Stalks
 Wikipedia Link    Plant Illustration    Plant Image     Deep Floral Scent
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Keep-Away-From-Children     Not-For-Internal-Consumption     Pregnancy(Avoid-During-Pregnancy)     Skin-Irritant(mild)
Health Uses: 
Candida   E. coli   Staph Infections  
Properties: 
Aphrodisiac   Fixative  
Oil Constituents
Germacrone 

Abstract: 
This oil is waxy and somewhat of a congealed green solid at room temperature. Once heated slightly it becomes liquid in form.

Zdravetz means "health" in Bulgarian and it is used throughout traditional Bulgarian medicine. It appears that Zdravetz is known as somewhat of a "panecea" in Bulgaria. In particular, it is commonly known to be excellent for sexual health in both men and women. Its also reported to work exceptionally well in Candida cases.

The plant can be found growing in forests, near streams, and abundant in gardens all over Bulgaria.

Addendum(s)
 Adulteration Risks
Commonly used in the perfume industry. Be sure of your supplier.


 
Zedoary -- Curcuma zedoaria Latin AliasOleum Zedoriae
French NameEssence de Zédoaire  German NameZitwerwurzelöl  
   
 
Div: Magnoliophyta, Class: Liliopsida, Order: Zingiberales, Family: Zingiberaceae, Genus: Curcuma L.   Specie: Curcuma zedoaria  L.
From: India  Indonesia  Nepal  Sri Lanka   
 Recommended Dilution: Low Note: Middle Astral Bodies: None Plant Catagory: Perennial
 Floral Water Commonly Sold:  Bridge Polarity     Element Plant Height: 1 m
 Common in Soapmaking:  Oil Shelf Life: 30 yrs Magical Powers: None Extraction: S/D
 Oil is Child Safe:  Oil Flash Point      Plant Part: Rhizomes
 Plant Illustration    Plant Image     
Approaches
Jonn is not yet aware of any specific approaches.
Blends Well With: 
Please see the following page for details: Blends With 
Cautions: 
Not-For-Internal-Consumption
Health Uses: 
Colic   Indigestion  

Open Source PDF Documents for Zedoary
 
1. Analgesic and Antimicrobial Activities of Curcuma zedoaria
2. Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils from Nine Starchy Curcuma Species
3. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant Activities and Chemical Composition of Thai Spices
 
4. In vitro antioxidant potential of the essential oil of Curcuma zedoaria
5. Pharmaceutical and Therapeutic Potentials of Essential Oils

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  ~  The Recommended Fine Print  ~
All information, suggestions, and opinions shown on this website are for educational purposes only and do not replace
medical advice nor are they intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease or health problems.
I am NOT a doctor and never, ever want to be one!         I am not responsible for any of your health choices!
Information given here has not been evaluated by the US FDA nor by any other U.S. governing body to the
best of my knowledge nor does it replace the advice of any licensed health-care professional.
Your health is your responsibility!!   Peace out.   ~ Jonn ☆ ~~